click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
be the way to do it. one of us suggested maybe he'd like to have a last smoke. so i got him his tobacco and his pipe, and he enjoyed that. and then he indicated that it was time. he took the gun-- he had loaded it-- and with the aid of his walker, we walked out to the garden. he chose the spot, and he decided he would lie down. so we said goodbye. and i shook his hand. i walked up the road a few hundred feet. i started to say, "god bless you," and i got "god bless" out when i heard the shot. he had put the revolver in his mouth, and it was instantly effective. and his pulse ceased soon after that. and i felt very sure that i could report that he was dead. >> narrator: john welles, a long-time friend of hunt williams, had been diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer a few months earlier. 66 years old and fiercely independent, john had always told friends that he would take his own life if he ever became incapacitated. >> to a man like john, this bear of a man who was reduced to an invalid, life didn't offer him anything after that. there are times, and certainly this was one of them, whe
affected. >> to us, it's just how we live. you don't get to make choices in how you live. >> one in 13 americans is now unemployed, and many children are growing up with little hope for their future. >> i'm surprised by how things can change so fast. you can go from doing okay to going hungry and on the verge of being homeless again. >> and we're going to start with numbers one through 20. >> food banks struggle to keep up with demand, and homeless shelters have long waiting lists, as even middle-income families sometimes lose their homes with just a few days' notice. >> if the tv can fit in your school bag, you can take it. if it didn't fit, you couldn't take it. >> we asked these children wht a life being poor in america really looks like, through their eyes. >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is ava
could find, which would have made life a lot easier for all of us. right. but what i saw initially, stylization. not only the colors that were used, but the way the colors are applied to this piece. let's show it in the round. the design is very unusual, and to my eye peculiar to shearwater pottery from ocean springs, mississippi, which started in 1928, and which was destroyed when katrina went through there a few years back. they're rebuilding it, but it's a very famous pottery, primarily run by walter and mac anderson, who did most of the decorating through the '30s and '40s and '50s. walter is recognized as an artistic genius. couldn't really socialize. he was left to himself to decorate and design. but this is what he did. the colors, the patterns. what also i notice, where the clay shows through, and then the clay color inside, looks to me like shearwater pottery. so i'm pretty sure that's what it is. and it's what we have to do when we don't have a mark. i did research. there's not an exact picture of this in any of the books that i found. and so we have to make certain educa
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)